Gout

Patients with Gout Often Do Not Meet Target Uric Acid Levels, Even with Treatment

By Phoebe Starr

San Diego, CA—Patients with gout and elevated serum uric acid levels are not receiving optimal urate-lowering therapy (ULT), according to the results of an international prospective study reported at the 2013 American College of Rheumatology meeting.

National Survey Results: Rheumatologists Not Treating Patients with Gout Aggressively Enough

By Wayne Kuznar

San Diego, CA—A high percentage of patients with gout treated by rheumatologists are not at treatment goals as recognized by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), even after 6 months or more of higher-dose urate-lowering therapy (ULT), according to the results from a national survey. Patients with more severe disease were less likely to be at treatment goal.

Poor Quality of Life and Increased Disability in Gout Highlighted in a New Study

By Rosemary Frei, MSc

A new multicenter study confirms that there is an independent association between gout and gout-related characteristics on the one hand and functional impairment and quality of life on the other. For example, polyarticular joint involvement is significantly associated with increased disability and with poorer overall quality of life for this patient population (Scirè CA, et al. Arthritis Res Ther. 2013;15:R101).

Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Useful for Diagnosing Gout

By Rosemary Frei, MSc

Montreal, Quebec—Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has value in gout diagnosis and management, according to a presentation at the Canadian Association of Radiologists’ 2013 annual meeting.

Relationship between Chronic Kidney Disease and Gout Uncovered for the First Time

By analyzing information from the National Health and Nu­trition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1988-1994 and 2007-2010, researchers have uncovered a 30% rate of gout prevalence among Americans with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). They also found significantly higher rates of gout among individuals with lower average estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) or higher levels of albuminuria, even after adjusting for uric acid levels (Juraschek SP, et al. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2013 Jan 8 [Epub ahead of print]).

By Rosemary Frei, MSc

Prophylaxis with Colchicine Often Used Inappropriately in Patients with Gout

Colchicine is an effective prophylaxis against gout only when it is taken consistently over 14 days by patients who are prone to gout attacks, according to study results by researchers from Boston University.

By Wayne Kuznar

Patients with Gout Considered Controlled with Urate-Lowering Therapy Often Continue to Flare

By Phoebe Starr

Acute flares leading to hospitalizations and emergency department visits pose a significant health burden, yet approximately 75% of patients with gout who are considered “controlled” on urate-lowering therapy continued to have flares over a 1-year period, according to a study presented at the 2012 meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.

Gout Treatments Continue to Target Inflammation, Pain, with Many New Drugs in the Pipeline

By Wayne Kuznar

The self-reported misery of many patients with gout is driving health professionals to stay at the forefront of administering effective treatments and expedient diagnoses to reduce pain and inflammation, one expert reported at the 2012 meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.

First-Ever ACR Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Gout

By Neil Canavan

For the first time in its 78-year history, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has issued guidelines for the management of gout in October, which were published in 2 parts (Khanna D, et al. Arthritis Care Res. 2012;64:1431-1461).

Only Half of Physicians Treat Gout According to New ACR Guideline Recommendations

By Neil Canavan

Cincinnati, OH—Results of a new study suggest that despite the availability of urate-lowering treatments (ULTs) and the newly published American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines for the treatment of gout, which were initially introduced at last year’s ACR annual meeting, no more than 50% of physicians are currently following these recommendations.