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Gout

Colchicine is an effective prophylaxis against gout only when it is taken consistently over 14 days by patients who are prone to gout attacks, according to study results by researchers from Boston University. By Wayne Kuznar
By Phoebe Starr Acute flares leading to hospitalizations and emergency department visits pose a significant health burden, yet approximately 75% of patients with gout who are considered “controlled” on urate-lowering therapy continued to have flares over a 1-year period, according to a study presented at the 2012 meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.
By Wayne Kuznar The self-reported misery of many patients with gout is driving health professionals to stay at the forefront of administering effective treatments and expedient diagnoses to reduce pain and inflammation, one expert reported at the 2012 meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.
By Neil Canavan For the first time in its 78-year history, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has issued guidelines for the management of gout in October, which were published in 2 parts (Khanna D, et al. Arthritis Care Res. 2012;64:1431-1461).
By Neil Canavan Cincinnati, OH—Results of a new study suggest that despite the availability of urate-lowering treatments (ULTs) and the newly published American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines for the treatment of gout, which were initially introduced at last year’s ACR annual meeting, no more than 50% of physicians are currently following these recommendations.
Hospitalization rates rise with uncontrolled uric acid levels By Neil Canavan Cincinnati, OH—Patients with gout who have uncontrolled serum uric acid levels are much more likely to utilize healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations and outpatient ser­vices, compared with patients with gout whose serum uric acid levels are being effectively managed, according to data from a large study of veterans conducted by Eswar Krishnan, MD, MPhil, Assistant Professor of Medi­cine at the Stanford School of Medi­cine, Palo Alto, CA, and colleagues. The study was presented in a poster at the October 2012 meeting of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy.
By Rosemary Frei, MSc Physicians should consider lead in the blood as a cause of gout in patients who do not appear to have other causes for their condition, according to researchers whose article on the topic was recently published (Krishnan E, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2012;157:233-241).
Hospitalization rates rise with uncontrolled uric acid levels By Neil Canavan Cincinnati, OH—Patients with gout who have uncontrolled serum uric acid levels are much more likely to utilize healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations and outpatient ser­vices, compared with patients with gout whose serum uric acid levels are being effectively managed, according to data from a large study of veterans conducted by Eswar Krishnan, MD, MPhil, Assistant Professor of Medi­cine at the Stanford School of Medi­cine, Palo Alto, CA, and colleagues. The study was presented in a poster at the October 2012 meeting of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy.
By Barbara Schwedel Washington, DC—Gout affects ap­proximately 1% to 2% of the US population. The results of 2 recent studies involving patients with gout were presented at a poster session during the 2012 International Society for Pharma­coeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) annual meeting.
By Sy Schlager, MD, PhD Gout flares occurring during the early months of urate-lowering therapy are thought to result from the release of urate crystals from deposits softened by the treatment.
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